Keep Air Free of Rodent Allergens

Keep Air Free of Rodent Allergens

It’s getting cold, and who can blame them for seeking a little comfort? We may all find the little mice in “Frederick” adorable as they winter in the stone wall, their droppings can spread disease and increase allergens.  So we definitely don’t want them in our homes or crawlspaces to contaminate the air. Here are 5 Tips to keep Frederick and his Rodent pals in the stone wall and out of your home.

Airborne Fall Allergens in Northern Oklahoma

Airborne Fall Allergens in Northern Oklahoma

The most common culprit of fall allergies for most people is airborne pollen.  Especially here in northern Oklahoma, Ragweed, Cedars and Nettleweed grow throughout the summer, but as they begin to bloom in the fall, the pollen is blown into the atmosphere, invading your home, carpeting, upholstery, drapes and A/C filters and ducts. Perhaps you’ve seen this video that went viral of someone shaking a cedar, releasing a cloud of pollen, drifting away. What’s most striking is that there is very little wind actually blowing, and yet the pollen drifts and drifts without settling.  This is because plants like ragweed, nettles and cedars are meant to proliferate with their counterparts sometimes miles away.  These plants are designed to produce pollen that is extremely lightweight, and meant to be airborne for miles and miles. For allergy sufferers, this is an obvious nightmare, and the only way to reduce exposure is by keeping indoor air quality high, and free of airborne particulates like ragweed and cedar pollen.  Frequent vacuuming, running the air conditioner, using doormats at all entryways, and changing air filters are good habits for those living with someone with seasonal allergies. Air duct cleaning is important as well.  Despite the high quality of hepa filters, pollen and airborne particulates will still settle in air-ducts, especially floor ducts.  The pollen in duct work can be a source of irritation to allergy and asthma sufferers.  Clean air ducts also promote more efficient air-flow, allowing fresh, filtered air to be continuously circulated throughout your home. If you’re concerned about the air quality in your home, or if you need air duct cleaning...
How do Air Purifiers Work?

How do Air Purifiers Work?

Although air purifiers seem like new technology, people have been seeking ways to reduce the amount of airborne particulates they inhale for hundreds of years.  During harvests, farming or construction, clothing and animal skins were used as masks to help workers breathe fewer particulates.  Thankfully, technology has come a long way since agrarian times, and filters are much more specialized to remove pollutants from the air. Air purifiers basically work in one of three ways.  They either physically capture particulates, attract them electromagnetically, or break down contaminants using ozone.  Some also use a combination of UV light and sieve filtration to remove and kill bacteria.  Air purifiers are also know as air filtration systems, and can range in size and complexity from “personal” (portable and battery operated) to industrial medicinal grade. Filters that are designed to operate like a sieve and capture particulate matter on the medium are the most common, and the best of these is the HEPA.  Most vacuum cleaners and Air Conditioning systems use HEPA filtration because is can capture up to 99.97% of particulates down to .3 microns. These type of filtration systems are effective for capturing airborne contaminants like smoke, pet dander, dust, asbestos, and pollen. Some filtration systems provide an extra level of purification by combining UV technology with the sieve model of physical filtration to kill bacteria in addition to capturing particulate matter.  UV light is cast in front of the filtration medium and kills virus, bacteria and mold spores before they pass into the HEPA or filtration medium, so they are dead in addition to being captured.  This is a good...
Proper Attic Ventilation to Prevent Moisture and Mold

Proper Attic Ventilation to Prevent Moisture and Mold

Did you know that the average home can generate about three gallons of moisture vapor each day? As it rises, it accumulates in the attic or crawlspace which ideally is venting out the baffles. However, if there’s a problem with the airflow in the attic, moisture and mold could be accumulating. Here are some ways you can tell if you may have a moisture problem in your attic or crawlspace. The air feels “close” still and smells of must and mildew. Attics are designed to facilitate air flow, and if the attic doesn’t feel “breezy” it may indicate there’s a problem with ventilation. You notice water dripping from vent fans, smoke detectors, or light fixtures. If moisture is accumulating behind these fixtures, there’s moisture build up in the attic or crawlspace above them. Wet insulation is definitely a bad sign and must be mitigated. Not only is moisture in the insulation a breeding ground for mold spores, but it can diminish the capacity of the insulation to properly maintain heat/cold barrier as designed. If you’re concerned about mold or moisture in your attic, crawlspace or air ducts, call David at Royal Restoration for help. Trusted by insurance agents and our clients, you can be sure of a fair estimate and quality work. 580-324-0919.  David is IICRC Certified in Structural Drying and Mold Mitigation and Odor...
Air Quality and Recent Oklahoma Wildfires

Air Quality and Recent Oklahoma Wildfires

We’re thankful that most of the fires are out now, but the air quality as a result of the increased smoke in the region is still a problem because smoke and soot don’t stay in the area where the fire is located, they can blow across vast regions of the state, from neighboring states, and even from as far away as California. The two main pollutants that are of specific concern during and after wildfires are Particulate Matter (PM) and Ozone Precursors. Atmospheric particulate matter, or PM, are microscopic solid or liquid particles suspended in the atmosphere (the air we breathe). The most common types of PM, especially during and after wildfires, are dust, dirt, soot, smoke, and drops of liquid. Coarser, larger particles cause irritation to nasal passages and throat, and can cause eye irritation resulting in dryness, redness and itching. Finer, smaller particles are more dangerous in that they can collect deep into the lungs, and even pass into the blood stream. Ozone Precursors include carbon monoxide, methane, hydrocarbons, and nitrogen oxides. When inhaled, these gasses can affect the body’s ability to uptake O2 and create other long-term health effects. The recommended precautionary measure during times of increased air pollution is to remain indoors as much as possible. But even indoors, it’s a good idea to take basic steps to make sure the air quality in your home and office is safe relative to outdoor air quality. Some basic steps you can take to improve air-quality indoors are: changing air filters cleaning / dusting returns air duct cleaning requesting air scrubbers keeping windows and doors closed as...